Ogdensburg looks to sell properties


Councilwoman Brenda O'Dell explains how the N.J. State makes it difficult for people to complete volunteer EMS training.
By Vera Olinski

OGDENSBURG — Ogdensburg Mayor George Hutnick told the Borough Council he recently attended a Land Use Board meeting to discuss the possibility of selling a Kennedy Avenue property.
In response, he said, the Land Use Board supported the property being sold and also provided a large list of other properties to potentially develop for commercial or residential use.
Furthermore, Hutnick said, most of the properties from the list are commercial and large enough for substantial buildings to generate taxes. The Land Use Board also agreed, he said, about the need to keep Ogdensburg fresh and looking good, so people want to be in town.
Later, officials discussed with a resident how town owned property is sold.
Hutnick said potential properties are assessed by the Land Use Board. If the Council and Land Use Board decide to sell the property, the property is appraised and goes to fair market bid for public sale.
After more discussion, Borough Attorney Richard Brigliadoro said he will research if there are additional caveats related to adjoining property of owners and the bidding process.
Drug Free Zone MapOfficials tabled the introduction of a “Drug Free Zone Map” until it can be expanded to include soccer fields owned by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Brigliadoro said there are “enhanced penalties for possession, sale or distribution of controlled dangerous substances within 1,000 ft. of the school and within 500 ft. of a public building or public park.”
He said someone in another area would still be committing a crime, but would not be subject to the enhanced penalty.
Additional businessCuncilman Anthony Nasisi said the Historical Building Steam Boiler is in very good shape, and they will complete a gas conversion costing around $3,000.
He also said he received two quotes for borough building electrical work, not including the exit signs, of $2,944 and $2,980. Before going forward, Hutnick and Nasisi will meet to discuss wiring for the court and internet.
Hutnick announced the borough had decided to keep Van Cleef Engineering Group as the Ogdensburg engineers.
Councilman David Astor asked where the responsibility would fall if something should happen while hydrant flushing because individuals are on both the DPW and the fire department.
Councilwoman Rachel Slater said both the DPW and fire department are under Ogdensburg insurance.
Brigliadoro said if the DPW workers are completing work during the day, the insurance would be under the DPW.
Councilwoman Brenda O’Dell reported even if the first aid squad were interested in renting their building, many things need to be completed first: kitchen set installed, fire codes brought up, and driveways finished, among many things.
They also need to brainstorm ways to help get new EMT members, O’Dell said, because the state is making it hard for people to get their “man hours.” Currently, EMT volunteers have to jump classes through a couple of counties, she added, making it so, “People just can’t get it done.”
Habitat for Humanity is looking for town groups to volunteer, O’Dell said, during the 5K on June 15. They are looking, she said, for people to: hand out water, t-shirts, and garbage bags, plus help as needed.
Hutnick also said the borough should see what else they could do that day because potentially there will be 800 to 1K people in town between racers, family members, and friends.
O’Dell also suggested having school kids run for $5 a head.
Slater added, people could possibly do a mile as a family for a cheaper rate.
Nasisi recommended getting town sponsors.